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Belfast Twelfth of July: Part 1

Posted by on Jul 15, 2014 in Current Events, Europe, Ireland, Journalism Today, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Background: The annual July 12th parades occur every year in Belfast and across Northern Ireland. The event celebrates the victory of Protestant King William of Orange over Catholic King James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690, which marked the beginning of Protestant Loyalist rule in Northern Ireland. Since this date there has been almost constant violence between the Protestant communities, that view themselves as loyal to the British government, and the Catholic communities, that want a united Ireland free of British rule. Northern Ireland, currently, is almost split 50/50 between the percentage of Protestant and Catholics living in the region. In Belfast, many of these neighbourhoods are split by barriers or “peace walls.” Even though Protestant and Catholic residences may live a few yards from one another, they rarely or never interact. Violence and separation has always been a constant reality in these...

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Reflections:with Brendan Kennelly

Posted by on May 29, 2014 in Europe, Ireland, Journalism Today, Literature, Media, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Interview with Irish poet Brendan...

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crossfade: Dublin’s underground club scene

Posted by on May 29, 2014 in Europe, Ireland, Journalism Today, Media, Music, Places to Trek | 0 comments

A documentary about the underground club scene in Dublin that has emerged from the ashes of the recession in Ireland....

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The City Of Love…Paris

Posted by on Mar 19, 2014 in Europe, France, Places to Trek, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Paris is a place that initially gives you a rush of euphoria with her beauty and the excitement she has to offer. Food, wine, architecture and culture contribute to making her the most romantic city in the world. It is a city where the greats once roamed. Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, Dali, etc. wondered drunkenly about the city, ages ago, and laid the road for dreamers alike to follow. It is a place for lovers where, at any historical landmark, couples can be seen locking faces and staring into each other with smiling eyes. Every night the Eiffel tower lights up the city for the first ten minutes of every hour. It stands as a beacon of hope for desperate boys wishing for a kiss from a pretty girl. For some of these starry-eyed lovers, Paris...

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Rum, Chorizo, and New Years In Spain

Posted by on Jan 10, 2014 in Europe, Places to Trek, Spain, Uncategorized | 0 comments

“There is no night life in Spain. They stay up late but they get up late. That is not night life. That is delaying the day. Night life is when you get up with a hangover in the morning. Night life is when everybody says what the hell and you do not  remember who paid the bill. Night life goes round and round and you look at the wall to make it stop. Night life comes out of a bottle and goes into a jar. If you think how much are the drinks it is not night life.” ― Ernest Hemingway, 88 Poems 3:00 p.m. the 1st of January, 2014. My heart jumps and my eyes snap open. “Where the hell am I?” The whole room is dark, besides a little bit of light shining through an open shutter....

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Humans of Dublin

Posted by on Dec 16, 2013 in Europe, Ireland, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Dublin is a city known for being multicultural. Almost every country and region in the world is represented through the many businesses that fill its landscape. On any day and at any time you can walk through the city center and hear multiple languages being spoken in unison. If you step back and listen for a while, you will notice that all these voices and languages begin to become one constant hum. For me, this hum represents our modern world in which globalization and ease of travel have created a very multicultural environment in almost every space. Marie Agnes had arrived in Dublin two hours prior to this photograph. She is originally from France , but was travelling through Dublin on her way to work in Belfast. While interviewing her we struggled with communication, due to the fact that...

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No Hablo Irish!

Posted by on Oct 23, 2013 in Europe, Ireland, Places to Trek, Uncategorized | 2 comments

You can spot them from a mile away. They move slowly, unless they are crossing the street, then they sprint. They wear the uniform of their kind consisting of necklace passport holders, wool Irish caps, and bright colored fanny-packs. They panic at rotating doors and constantly overuse “thank you” and “sorry.” They are the American tourist. They are best spotted on any average day, in the city center of Dublin, wondering around lost. You can see in their faces the hopes and dreams of leprechauns, wool sweaters, bagpipes, and rickety old pubs slowly being torn apart by the modernity and harshness that is Dublin. Although they come out in large numbers, the American tourists are not the only, lost and oblivious, tourist country wondering around the streets of Dublin. The Chinese tourists seem to live their whole trip behind...

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“It Never Got Weird Enough For Me” Study Abroad In Non-Traditional Locations Part 2

Posted by on May 12, 2013 in Asia, Europe, Places to Trek, Turkey | 0 comments

This is a story written by my good friend Tristan Hicks.  We met, while on study abroad, in South Africa and realized  we had both come from West Virginia University. From the time we spent in South Africa and back in the states, he has been a strong motivator for me to not only travel, but to travel in a way that pushes all of the normal boundaries travelers tend to place on themselves. This particular article is from VagabondJourney.com where you can follow Tristan’s and others travel stories. This is an excerpt from his most recent article. A truly fitting piece of writing for The Traveling Hobo.  -Evan   There is one big difference between people who Study Abroad in “traditional” locations and those who study abroad in places that are truly different from their home cultures. After speaking with hundreds of returned...

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Southern Spain-Ten Days On Narrow Roads Along The Mediterranean

Posted by on Apr 5, 2013 in Europe, Places to Trek, Spain | 0 comments

This is a story sent to me from Erik Bergin from the Traveling Reporter on his travels in southern Spain. Southern Europe is a world of its own. But perhaps not in the way you would think. Erik Bergin on how he found the Wild West, a fairy tale castle and the continent’s largest palm farm on Spain’s narrow roads from Alicante to Málaga, FROM ALICANTE TO MÁLAGA. The journey starts with a heavy walk. I am in Alicante, the south Spanish city along the Mediterranean, which has an old fortress looming on a hilltop, which I attempt to climb. The fortress is called Castillo Santa Barbara. And the air is hot. Being May, summer is already well under way in this part of Europe. But the wind is blowing nicely and the view up here on the hill over sea, city and...

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