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Belfast Twelfth of July: Part 1

Posted by on Jul 15, 2014 in Current Events, Europe, Ireland, Journalism Today, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Background: The annual July 12th parades occur every year in Belfast and across Northern Ireland. The event celebrates the victory of Protestant King William of Orange over Catholic King James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690, which marked the beginning of Protestant Loyalist rule in Northern Ireland. Since this date there has been almost constant violence between the Protestant communities, that view themselves as loyal to the British government, and the Catholic communities, that want a united Ireland free of British rule. Northern Ireland, currently, is almost split 50/50 between the percentage of Protestant and Catholics living in the region. In Belfast, many of these neighbourhoods are split by barriers or “peace walls.” Even though Protestant and Catholic residences may live a few yards from one another, they rarely or never interact. Violence and separation has always been a constant reality in these...

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Reflections:with Brendan Kennelly

Posted by on May 29, 2014 in Europe, Ireland, Journalism Today, Literature, Media, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Interview with Irish poet Brendan...

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crossfade: Dublin’s underground club scene

Posted by on May 29, 2014 in Europe, Ireland, Journalism Today, Media, Music, Places to Trek | 0 comments

A documentary about the underground club scene in Dublin that has emerged from the ashes of the recession in Ireland....

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The City Of Love…Paris

Posted by on Mar 19, 2014 in Europe, France, Places to Trek, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Paris is a place that initially gives you a rush of euphoria with her beauty and the excitement she has to offer. Food, wine, architecture and culture contribute to making her the most romantic city in the world. It is a city where the greats once roamed. Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, Dali, etc. wondered drunkenly about the city, ages ago, and laid the road for dreamers alike to follow. It is a place for lovers where, at any historical landmark, couples can be seen locking faces and staring into each other with smiling eyes. Every night the Eiffel tower lights up the city for the first ten minutes of every hour. It stands as a beacon of hope for desperate boys wishing for a kiss from a pretty girl. For some of these starry-eyed lovers, Paris...

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Rum, Chorizo, and New Years In Spain

Posted by on Jan 10, 2014 in Europe, Places to Trek, Spain, Uncategorized | 0 comments

“There is no night life in Spain. They stay up late but they get up late. That is not night life. That is delaying the day. Night life is when you get up with a hangover in the morning. Night life is when everybody says what the hell and you do not  remember who paid the bill. Night life goes round and round and you look at the wall to make it stop. Night life comes out of a bottle and goes into a jar. If you think how much are the drinks it is not night life.” ― Ernest Hemingway, 88 Poems 3:00 p.m. the 1st of January, 2014. My heart jumps and my eyes snap open. “Where the hell am I?” The whole room is dark, besides a little bit of light shining through an open shutter....

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Humans of Dublin

Posted by on Dec 16, 2013 in Europe, Ireland, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Dublin is a city known for being multicultural. Almost every country and region in the world is represented through the many businesses that fill its landscape. On any day and at any time you can walk through the city center and hear multiple languages being spoken in unison. If you step back and listen for a while, you will notice that all these voices and languages begin to become one constant hum. For me, this hum represents our modern world in which globalization and ease of travel have created a very multicultural environment in almost every space. Marie Agnes had arrived in Dublin two hours prior to this photograph. She is originally from France , but was travelling through Dublin on her way to work in Belfast. While interviewing her we struggled with communication, due to the fact that...

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No Hablo Irish!

Posted by on Oct 23, 2013 in Europe, Ireland, Places to Trek, Uncategorized | 2 comments

You can spot them from a mile away. They move slowly, unless they are crossing the street, then they sprint. They wear the uniform of their kind consisting of necklace passport holders, wool Irish caps, and bright colored fanny-packs. They panic at rotating doors and constantly overuse “thank you” and “sorry.” They are the American tourist. They are best spotted on any average day, in the city center of Dublin, wondering around lost. You can see in their faces the hopes and dreams of leprechauns, wool sweaters, bagpipes, and rickety old pubs slowly being torn apart by the modernity and harshness that is Dublin. Although they come out in large numbers, the American tourists are not the only, lost and oblivious, tourist country wondering around the streets of Dublin. The Chinese tourists seem to live their whole trip behind...

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Colorado Archery Hunt- Taxidermy Trails Ep. 2

Posted by on Aug 30, 2013 in Colorado, Colorado, Go West U.S., North America, Places to Trek | 0 comments

http://youtu.be/qkVxu_Xt3Cs This is one of the end results of my time spent living out West, while working as a cameraman for the television show Taxidermy Trails. During this time, I traveled with, Archery Hunter and President of the Pennsylvania Institute of Taxidermy, Dan Bantley to multiple locations to document his hunts and outdoor travels. To read other stories about the making of this show go to- The Full Process-The full process of hunting, skinning, and butchering a kill. The Moose Hunt-Story about the excitement of Montana Moose hunting. Missouri Breaks- Story about hunting elk in the Missouri Breaks located  in Eastern Montana. Eastern Montana and the Missouri Breaks- My first hunting experience in the Missouri Breaks First Day Out In Montana- My close encounter with a mountain lion.  ...

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Reenacting the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg

Posted by on Aug 22, 2013 in Civil War, Go East USA, Journalism Today, North America, Places to Trek | 0 comments

“There’s so many stars up there.” “What?” I opened my eyes and watched the stars spin before my eyes and then come to a stop. The whiskey was still fresh on my breath.”Yea, its been a while since I’ve seen that many stars”Above me, dressed in blue pants, a checkered shirt, a long beard, and old eyes gazing at the sky, stood a Union Civil War soldier. “Mind if I sit down beside you here.” “Sure, I was about to go to sleep, but I’m awake now.” He hit the ground, like a ton of bricks, and sprawled out on the grass next to the fire. I could tell right away he was hammered off his ass. “I used to live in the mountains.” “Oh? Did you now” “Yea back in the sixties. A bunch of us moved into...

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Gettysburg 150th Anniversary Reenactment- From The Frontlines

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Media | 0 comments

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The old forest

Posted by on May 13, 2013 in Media | 0 comments

A pic taken of Evan McCaffrey in an old growth forest near Trout Creek,...

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“It Never Got Weird Enough For Me” Study Abroad In Non-Traditional Locations Part 2

Posted by on May 12, 2013 in Asia, Europe, Places to Trek, Turkey | 0 comments

This is a story written by my good friend Tristan Hicks.  We met, while on study abroad, in South Africa and realized  we had both come from West Virginia University. From the time we spent in South Africa and back in the states, he has been a strong motivator for me to not only travel, but to travel in a way that pushes all of the normal boundaries travelers tend to place on themselves. This particular article is from VagabondJourney.com where you can follow Tristan’s and others travel stories. This is an excerpt from his most recent article. A truly fitting piece of writing for The Traveling Hobo.  -Evan   There is one big difference between people who Study Abroad in “traditional” locations and those who study abroad in places that are truly different from their home cultures. After speaking with hundreds of returned...

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Flying Boats!

Posted by on Apr 24, 2013 in Media, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it’s a boat… Like a scene out of a Twister movie a boat comes flying across the screen and proceeds to smash into the side of a car. The comical iPhone video was filmed during a rare thunderstorm in the hills of Hollidaysburg, Pa. Evan McCaffrey was on his front porch when a strange funnel cloud began to form above his house. Quick thinking and intuition drove him to take out his phone and film the storm. Much to his surprise a fishing boat was lifted by the high winds from a neighbours house. It proceeded to fly through the air and land on top of his car. Evan says that the boat and the car were both damaged by the impact. At least he has video evidence for the...

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Southern Spain-Ten Days On Narrow Roads Along The Mediterranean

Posted by on Apr 5, 2013 in Europe, Places to Trek, Spain | 0 comments

This is a story sent to me from Erik Bergin from the Traveling Reporter on his travels in southern Spain. Southern Europe is a world of its own. But perhaps not in the way you would think. Erik Bergin on how he found the Wild West, a fairy tale castle and the continent’s largest palm farm on Spain’s narrow roads from Alicante to Málaga, FROM ALICANTE TO MÁLAGA. The journey starts with a heavy walk. I am in Alicante, the south Spanish city along the Mediterranean, which has an old fortress looming on a hilltop, which I attempt to climb. The fortress is called Castillo Santa Barbara. And the air is hot. Being May, summer is already well under way in this part of Europe. But the wind is blowing nicely and the view up here on the hill over sea, city and...

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Quite a lot about a small part of Santiago.

Posted by on Mar 13, 2013 in Chile, Places to Trek, South America | 0 comments

This is a story written by my friend Daniel Hagen, who introduced me to South Africa and showed me its true culture and people. He has recently moved to Chile to teach English. If you would like to hear more of his adventures visit here! -Evan Quite a lot about a small part of Santiago. “I grew up in this town, my poetry was born between the hill and the river, it took its voice from the rain, and like the timber, it steeped itself in the forests.” – Pablo Neruda Saddam Hussein is alive and he drives a taxi in Santiago. I saw him just the other day. I have now spent just over a week in Santiago, having arrived in less than ideal circumstances.  Getting from Brazil to Chile was not a pleasant experience, with a needless...

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Violent Ignorance-The obsession with fake violence in the first-world

Posted by on Mar 1, 2013 in Current Events, Journalism Today | 0 comments

I believe a large problem, with our culture in the U.S. and others in the western world, is we are obsessed with violence and war. It isn’t  real violence or war, but rather a fake interpretation of war that we pretend to be real. Our video games, movies, etc. give us a fake interpretation of what “violence” is. In the movies, we see Bruce Willis firing the machine gun, things exploding, and people falling down. In video games, we get shot and are allowed start over again. There is no finality to it. Let me first point out that these movies and video games don’t bother me and I am as entertained, as anybody, to watch or play them, but this turns into a problem when, as a whole culture, we make unified and conscious decision to go to...

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Colorado Archery Hunt- Taxidermy Trails

Posted by on Feb 2, 2013 in Colorado, Go West U.S., Media, North America, Places to Trek | 0 comments

http://youtu.be/qkVxu_Xt3Cs This is one of the end results of my time spent living out West working as a cameraman for the television show Taxidermy Trails. During this time I traveled with Archery Hunter and President of the Pennsylvania Institute of Taxidermy, Dan Bantley to multiple locations documenting his hunts and outdoor...

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Moose Stew with Gravy

Posted by on Jan 25, 2013 in Go West U.S., Montana, North America, Places to Trek | 0 comments

After spending three months filming a moose hunt in the mountains of Montana, packing out the quartered carcass across the rocky mountains, and processing the meat for days, I can finally reap the rewards of my labor. This is a simple and easy recipe to make, but no less tasty. The main ingredients include- -Pressure cooker -2 lbs of moose meat -6 small potatoes -1 onion -5 garlic cloves -3 long carrots -1 tbsp olive oil -salt -pepper -1/2 cup white wine -2 cups water -2 cans of beef gravy First, set your pressure cooker to brown. Chop up the moose meat into squares and brown in the pressure cooker with 1 tbsp of olive oil. After browning the meat add the 1/2 cup of white wine and allow to cook until wine is dissolved.   While the meat...

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The Full Process

Posted by on Dec 28, 2012 in Go West U.S., Montana, Places to Trek | 0 comments

When you turn on a hunting television show you see the the hunt, the kill, the hunter standing over their kill, and the end. But, as every hunter knows, there is a lot more that takes place than just these few steps. What about the trek into the mountains? Watching the last convulsions of the animal before it dies? The pack-out of the 500 pound creature? Or skinning and the processing of the meat? Adding it all up, these television shows only show a small percentage of what hunting actually is. As a hunter, I am supportive of hunting if it is done the right way. If you kill it, you eat it. The poachers, the road hunters, and these television shows poorly represent actual hunters and give them a bad name. The great television hunters would have the...

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The War Photographer

Posted by on Nov 25, 2012 in Current Events, Journalism Today | 0 comments

War is the lowest or at least one of the lowest attributes of the human species. In the 21st century we claim to be more evolved, more intelligent, and more civilized than our early ancestors. But, we are still animals. Every animal in nature has a defense mechanism, that defends them against danger, and humans are no different. We see danger from other human beings and we react with violence. At the same time, our consciousness has evolved and most of us agree that killing another human is taboo or wrong. Religions around the world preach against killing another human and governments punish their citizens for committing it, while at the same time we support an acceptable form of killing in the form of war. It is almost as if humans are so vulnerable to their instincts that we...

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Pepper Spray, Puking, and Occupy D.C.

Posted by on Nov 18, 2012 in Current Events, Journalism Today | 0 comments

One thing I’ve learned from my first protest is to always bring a face-mask or, even more, a gas mask, because frankly pepper spray sucks. I found this out first-hand last year during the peak of the Occupy movement.  College life at West Virginia University began to feel repetitive,  so to break up the monotony I jumped in the car and drove for 3 hours to a subway station outside of Washington D.C. Repping army boots and my canvas camera backpack I use for hiking, I became an anomaly in the middle of the business crowd rushing like cattle towards their box cubicles where they would spend the rest of their day staring at computer screens until they turned into money and could buy them a new television screen that they could go home  and stare at until they fell asleep. Manufactured...

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Share Your Story

Posted by on Nov 14, 2012 in Share Your Story | 0 comments

Name: E-Mail: Post: Category: UncategorizedA Wee Bit Of CreativityBooksChileEuropeJournalism TodayMusicMuslim AmericanMust Read Books for AdventurersPlaces to TrekShare Your StorySouth AmericaSouth DakotaSpainAfricaCivil WarCurrent EventsGo East USAGo West U.S.MontanaNational ParksNew OrleansAsiaTurkeyMediaColoradoColoradoIrelandFranceLiteratureNorth AmericaEcuador Post Tags: Separate items with commas Content: You are uploaded: X You can upload one image and add text Upload Image Choose a file to upload: Uploading... Image Properties File Name: Align: NoneLeft Width: px.Maximum image width 600 px....

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The Moose Hunt

Posted by on Nov 5, 2012 in Go West U.S., Montana, Places to Trek | 0 comments

I stared up towards the top of the mountain as Dan (the hunter who I was filming a television show for) disappeared into the fog as the beginning of a long snow storm rolled over me.  I was now alone. Dan was supposed to be guiding me towards the moose that we had shot two hours earlier, but we were unable to find so far. Now, as I stood in waist deep snow hundreds of yards down a steep incline in the Northwestern Montana Rockies, the hunter who was supposed to be leading me in the direction of a wounded moose, had disappeared into a white-out. Earlier, we had first seen the bull-moose with a cow-moose grazing below us.  We moved across the crest of the mountain and ,because of the distance of the shot, laid down to shoot. There...

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Checkin out the Tea Party

Posted by on Oct 18, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

As every good journalist should do, get all the viewpoints, I am checking out a Tea Party meeting in the small rural town of Thompson Falls, Montana. They will be watching and discussing the conservative movie Occupy Unleashed at the local theater. I was personally pepper sprayed by police photographing Occupy D.C. So hopefully this is a little more...

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Riding in style in Thompson Falls, Montana

Posted by on Oct 16, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

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The Final Revelation- A Young American Conversion to Islam

Posted by on Oct 16, 2012 in Journalism Today, Muslim American | 0 comments

This story was done about Stefni Richards an all American girl who was born in Fairmont, West Virginia.  Her freshman year she began to become interested in Islam from an Arabic exchange student she was friends with.  Last year, she converted to Islam which was a very large change in her life.  I documented the first stages of her transition. I tried to focus not only on her religion, but on other aspects of her life including work, school, and her relationship with her boyfriend who is from Malaysia.  I feel my story contained a lot of juxtaposition, but told the story in a neutral non-judgmental way. The whole experience allowed me to see a culture and view point that I had never seen before and that I most likely would of not seen if it weren’t for journalism....

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Cedar Creek Battle

Posted by on Oct 16, 2012 in Civil War, Journalism Today | 0 comments

Printed in Civil War Courier Magazine What Reenacting Means To Me Imagine it’s an October night time in a Virginian field and the stars fill the sky. You march, from the warmth of the campfire, into the darkness.  No one speaks and the only sound is the soft putter of brogans on rock and grass.  You hold your Springfield rifle in your hand and stare off into the darkness when, suddenly, your captain whispers sharply to “Halt!” Your captain stares off at tree line in the distance, which begins to excite your fellow soldiers.  “Fire!” A voice booms out and a flash of fire, followed by the sound of rifles, erupts from the tree line.  Everyone begins to scramble into line as the officers try to shout orders.  A huge shrill cry comes forth from the tree line, and...

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The Dixieland Duke

Posted by on Oct 16, 2012 in Journalism Today, Music | 0 comments

By Jacqueline Delphin, Paige Carver, and Evan McCaffrey Originally on WVU WordPress Imagine a  warm night on High Street in Morgantown, W. Va., the notorious downtown party center of West Virginia University.  Students dressed for the night’s festivities walk along in packs towards their favorite destinations.  In the distance a commotion breaks the crowd as a street band dressed in full Jazz regalia dances and belts out the old Dixieland Jazz tune “When the Saints Go Marching In.” Some students move aside for the out of the ordinary sight, but many follow along and dance in appreciation. If you didn’t look closely at the group, you’d probably miss the man who seems of a different generation than the mostly twenty-something band members.  But then you would miss Larry Schwab, a young at heart 71-year-old trumpeter for the “High Street Jazz Band.”...

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Missouri Breaks

Posted by on Oct 15, 2012 in Go West U.S., Montana, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Trekking deep into the wilderness in search of Elk can bring you to places where no other human has traveled in years. One great place to do this is in the Missouri Breaks in Eastern Montana.  The desert terrain of the land, with the addition of the constantly moving mountains of sand and dirt carved from the overflowing Missouri river, makes the land very difficult to explore.  The first European’s to explore into this territory were the Lewis and Clark expedition which warned of the perils of land the land including the prickly pears(whose thorns caused Lewis’s foot to swell with infection), the Grizzly Bears, and the threat of the “Gumbo” when it rains (Gumbo refers to deep slippery mud that forms in the Breaks even with a small amount of rain). Lewis concluded that no one would ever settle on this land....

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Eastern Montana and the Missouri Breaks

Posted by on Sep 7, 2012 in Go West U.S., Montana, Places to Trek | 1 comment

About to leave for Colorado for 3 weeks to hunt elk at high elevation. Sadly I will not have cellphone or internet to keep in contact with the outside world. But, in the meantime here is some photos I was able to take in between filming elk hunting in the Missouri Breaks and Antelope hunting in eastern Montana. We began this trip by staying at a Hutterite community in an old abandoned farm-house in the middle of the plains. The Hutterites who thrive off the profit of their vast amounts of land and farming live here disconnected from the world. They rarely make contact with outsiders,so to say the least they enjoyed our company. When on the farm, however disconnected from the world, the world still finds you in the form of nuclear missile silos. Supposedly, very anti-war even...

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Go West Continued…Western South Dakota, Wyoming and Montana

Posted by on Aug 29, 2012 in Go West U.S., Montana, Places to Trek, South Dakota | 0 comments

Left Brookings, South Dakota and my great girlfriend on Saturday and headed West towards Montana where I will be filming a wildlife/hunting show for the next three months. During the 12 hour drive to Billings, Montana I moved through the plains of the Northwest and watched the gradual change in the landscape.  While travelling many of the same paths as the Lewis and Clarke expedition I felt as if I was living a history book. Many of the rivers and mountains I stopped to photograph were historical markers where either Lewis, Clarke, or Sacagawea had paved the way West. While travelling across the plains I began to grasp the harshness of the terrain. The dry climate has caused a land void of life and full of run down remnants of past boom days.  Old crumbling ranches, abandoned cars, and rusty farm equipment litter...

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First day out in Montana and the Mountain Lion Run In

Posted by on Aug 28, 2012 in Go West U.S., Montana, Places to Trek | 2 comments

This was my first day out in the Montana wilderness and I have already had a once in a life time experience. A cougar came out of the trees and sat staring at us in the middle of the road. Many people live there their whole lives and never see one....

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Go West-South Dakota

Posted by on Aug 24, 2012 in Go West U.S., Places to Trek, South Dakota | 0 comments

Started the engine in Pennsylvania and bolted off like a bat out of hell towards the West Coast. The stir crazy feeling of staying put in one place for too long had finally become too heavy for me to handle.  Just in the nick of time I was invited to head to Montana to film a wildlife hunting show for Dan Bantley’s show “Taxidermy Trails” which airs on the Outdoor Channel. I originally planned on flying, but when I found out my girlfriend had been offered a job at South Dakota State University I decided it was better to drive plus it fit more into the adventurers spirit-style of travel.  I prepared my mental state by reading “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance,” a book that follows a man and his son on a motorcycle trip across the Northwest which becomes less of...

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The List of Truths

Posted by on Aug 15, 2012 in Uncategorized | 0 comments

I kept getting this weird feeling that everything was a lie.  I knew this couldn’t be true so I sat down and tried to outline what was causing me to feel this way.  During this search for the lie my eyes were opened up to a whole new world that runs parallel to our own full of truths and reality, but which has been altered by the artifacts of the human race .  This world is much like our own, but what it contains is the pure truths that haven’t been altered to fit our reality.  What I started then to realize was that we live in a world of competing “truths” where only certain ones are not man-made and are the natural truths. So, I wanted to start a list that  sheds light on the  natural “truths” of this world that seem...

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New Orleans and the Dark Side of Human Debauchery

Posted by on Aug 14, 2012 in Go East USA, New Orleans, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Started to look through my old photos of New Orleans to try black and white. What I found is it brought to my attention a whole new theme of New Orleans debauchery. In color the photos I chose were fiesta themed, but the black and white photos began to show the dark side of New Orleans....

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Canoe Creek State Park

Posted by on Aug 8, 2012 in Go East USA, National Parks, Places to Trek | 0 comments

Took the dog for a hike around Canoe Creek State Park.  I should have gotten better photos, but my she decided to chase away all the deer. From the Parks website- http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/findapark/canoecreek/index.htm The beautiful, 958-acre Canoe Creek State Park features a 155-acre lake, wetlands, old fields and mature forests, which provide critical habitat for migrating birds and for one of the largest bat colonies in the Commonwealth. The lake is popular for fishing year-round. Hikers enjoy the trails that wind through the many habitats. Picnicking, swimming at the beach, enjoying educational programs, and staying the night in a modern cabin are also popular activities. Picnicking: Scenic, shaded areas on the east and west sides of the park provide many options for picnics and gatherings. There are picnic tables, charcoal grills and charcoal disposal units. Three picnic pavilions are available...

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Prince Gallitzin State Park

Posted by on Aug 3, 2012 in Go East USA, National Parks, Places to Trek | 0 comments

My camping trip to Prince Gallitzin State Park. From the Park Website-http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/stateparks/findapark/princegallitzin/index.htm Prince Gallitzin Prince Gallitzin State Park is named for Father Demetrius Augustine Gallitzin. Born in Holland (Netherlands) on December 22, 1770, he was the only son of Prince Dimitri Alexievitch Gallitzin, Russian Ambassador to Holland, and his wife Amalia Von Schmettau Gallitzin. In 1792, young Gallitzin arrived in the United States and became intrigued at the contrast between the terrible social and political state of France and the civil and religious liberty that had become fundamental principles in the social structure of the new country. He determined to devote his life to being a Catholic priest and entered the Sulpician Seminary in Baltimore. On March 18, 1795, Gallitzin was ordained as one of the earliest people in the United States upon whom the full orders of the...

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South African Adventure To Rastafarian Community

Posted by on Aug 3, 2012 in Africa, Places to Trek | 3 comments

South African Adventure To Rastafarian Community By: Evan McCaffrey During my freshman year of at West Virginia University I began to get a strong sense of restlessness and un-fulfillment. At the time I was reading a novel called Henderson and the Rain King. A story written by Saul Bellow of a spiritual journey of a rich middle-aged man who feels unfulfilled with his life and travels to Africa to discover his true identity . In the novel Henderson asks if every man has his Africa? This question stuck with me and instead of taking it figuratively, like it was meant to be, I went to my student exchange office and signed up to study abroad in South Africa. After working all summer to pay for the trip I arrived at Stellenbosch University. I immediately fell in love with the...

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Missing Joe Paterno Statue On Day of Sanctions

Posted by on Jul 24, 2012 in Current Events, Journalism Today | 0 comments

[slideshow] News crews and reporters flocked around the entrance to Pennstate’s Beaver Stadium. A fence lined with a blue tarp circled the empty space where the Joe Paterno statue once stood. People from all over the country peeked through the holes in the tarp to see if it was actually true. One individual had even traveled 4 hours to see  what she had only watched on the news. “My whole family are Pennstater’s, I had to drive here and see it for myself.” All around campus the attitude was somewhat somber as they let the NCAA “death penalty” soak in. They began to realize that the loss of money by the University could mean the loss of jobs in their community, which relies strongly on the school . In the normal Pennstate spirit, many in State College wore their...

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The Impact of MMA Legalization in West Virginia

Posted by on Jul 24, 2012 in Current Events, Journalism Today | 0 comments

On March 24, 2011, West Virginia became the 45th state to pass legislation for the sport of Mixed Martial Arts. Passing the law came about after strong opposition by some of the state’s House of Delegates members, who thought the sport was too violent. Mixed Martial Arts is an organized fighting event that takes place in a ring surrounded by a cage. Fighters use a mixture of martial arts fighting styles such as Jiu Jitzu and Kickboxing, giving the sport the its name, Mixed Martial Arts. Since MMA fights were legalized, the sport has grown quite quickly in the region. Gyms that teach martial arts across the state have begun to train fighters and have seen the number of members steadily rise. One Morgantown gym, Anu Academy, trains people in many different types of fighting, including MMA. Gym owner, Neale...

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